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At Fluxion, we’re passionate about delivering cell-based and cell-free solutions that facilitate the transformation of research discoveries into new ways to diagnose and treat patients. By characterizing molecular and cellular mechanisms of disease, Fluxion’s platforms help bridge the translational medicine gap, enabling rapid advances in disease research, drug discovery, and the development of diagnostic tests.

–  Feb 18 - 21, 2022  –

Biophysical Society 66th Annual Meeting

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Visit our booth

Moscone Center, Exhibit hall

Booth 318

Exhibit open from Sunday 20th to Tuesday 21st

BPS 2022

 

Systems at the Booth

Automated Patch Clamp Systems

Automated Patch Clamp Systems

IonFlux Mercury

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Cellular Analysis Systems

Cellular Analysis Systems

BioFlux Systems

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Schedule a one-on-one meeting with one of our team members.

Fluxion Events at Biophysics

Friday

8:30 AM to
530 PM
Drug Discovery for Ion Channels XXII

Satellite Meeting

This year’s meeting will highlight presentations from drug discovery companies, companies that provide ion channel services to drug discovery companies and companies that provide products to ion channel drug discovery companies, as well as other speakers in the field of ion channel drug discovery, including several academic speakers.

Registration Page

Sunday

12:30 PM to
2:00 PM
Product Presentation

with Ali Yehia & Jeff Jensen

From Immunology to Ion Channels: Microfluidic Approaches to Automated Patch Clamp and Cellular Analysis. A Look at IonFlux Mercury and BioFlux Systems from Fluxion Biosciences. Leveraging proprietary microfluidic approaches, Fluxion Biosciences provides unique solutions that simplify and automate complex cell-based assays. This presentation will cover two Fluxion systems used extensively in biophysical characterization of cells: IonFlux and BioFlux.

Register for Product Presentation

Poster Presentations

ELECTRICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SHORT AND LONG GAMMA SUBUNIT SPLICE VARIANTS OF HUMAN GABAA RECEPTORS
Nathan Hunt1, Ona McConnell2, Eric Wang2, Ali Yehia1.

1Fluxion Biosciences, Alameda, CA, USA, 2Dept. of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology, Center for Neurogenetics, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA.

Abstract:
Sleep aids, anti-anxiety medications, anesthetics, alcohol, and neurosteroids all target GABAA receptors (GABAARs), which regulate the bulk of rapid inhibition in the mammalian brain. GABAA receptors are pentamers of α, β and ɣ subunits, with the ɣ2 subunit having two splice variants (ɣ2S and ɣ2L). These two variants are distinguished by 8 amino acid differences when integrated into the pentameric receptors. It been noted that they have assorted patterns of regional distribution during development and in the adult brain with the ɣ2L dominating in later stages of life. Using a microfluidics based automated patch clamp assay, we investigated the subtle ionic current differences between these ɣ2 splice variants under different conditions of agonist, allosteric modulation and block. Data will be presented from splice variants of human α1β2ɣ2, α2β2ɣ2 and α3β2ɣ2 GABA A receptors.

PHARMACOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF A PRIMARY NICOTINIC RECEPTOR FROM THE NEUROMUSCULAR JUNCTION
 Andrew Cook1, Muthukrishnan Renganathan1, Dazhi Xiong1, Cassidy Kilpack1, Ali Yehia2, Bryan Koci1.

1Eurofins Panlabs U.S., Inc., St. Charles, MO, USA, 2Fluxion Biosciences, Alameda, CA, USA.

Abstract:
Nicotinic receptors at the neuromuscular junction are important targets in the study of autoimmune disorders such as myasthenia gravis. Historic efforts targeting nAChR drug discovery focused on fluorescence based calcium flux assays along with low throughput manual patch clamp techniques due to its dependence on complete liquid exchange. With the advent of next generation automated patch champ instruments with integrated solution control and rapid solution change, extensive pharmacological characterization of the neuromuscular nAChR ((α1)2β1γδ) is now possible. This study aims to develop a sensitive and stable screening assay in order to profile the activities of new chemical entities against the main nAChR involved in myasthenia gravis. Data from several known agonists and antagonists will be presented.

 

Moscone Center

747 Howard St, San Francisco, CA 94103